Fire meat

    Fire meat

    (258)
    44saves
    2hr20min


    216 people made this

    About this recipe: The Korean dish Bulgogi literally translates to 'fire meat'. Also popular in China and across Asia, 'fire meat' offers a refreshing change from standard fare recipes. An ice cold beer is recommended with fire meat. Delicious and easy to prepare.

    Ingredients
    Serves: 4 

    • 125ml soy sauce
    • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
    • 2 tablespoons dark brown soft sugar
    • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
    • 1 large red onion, chopped
    • ground black pepper to taste
    • 1 teaspoon dried red chilli flakes
    • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds
    • 2 leeks, chopped
    • 1 small carrot, chopped
    • 450g beef frying steak, sliced paper thin

    Method
    Prep:15min  ›  Cook:5min  ›  Extra time:2hr marinating  ›  Ready in:2hr20min 

    1. In a large bowl, mix together the soy sauce, sesame oil, dark brown soft sugar, garlic and red onion. Stir in the black pepper, red chilli flakes, sesame seeds, leeks and carrot. Mix in the steak by hand to ensure even coating. Cover and let marinate for at least 2 hours or overnight.
    2. Brush the bottom half of a wok with cooking oil, and heat over medium-high heat. Add all of the steak and marinade at once, and cook stirring constantly. The beef will be cooked after just a few minutes. Remove from heat and serve with rice or noodles. For Korean style fire meat, roll the meat mixture up in a leaf of red lettuce.
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    Reviews & ratings
    Average global rating:
    (258)

    Reviews in English (258)

    by
    81

    Marinating the meat longer than 2 hours just turned it to a slimy, mushy mess. I marinated mine for 2 hours, than drained off the marinade, reserving it for later, patted the meat dry, and browned in batches in a 12-inch skillet so the meat would actually brown. Only after all the meat was browned and added back to the pan, did I add the marinade do the pan. Don't use round steak, it gets tough and rubbery very easy and has a livery taste, use sirloin or flank steak for better tenderness and flavor.  -  27 Dec 2006  (Review from Allrecipes US | Canada)

    by
    79

    A couple of options regarding the marinade: If done in a wok, cook the meat and veg first. Put on a plate, then add the marinade to the wok and reduce. Pour on top of the meat/veg. If done in a skillet, make sure it is 12" which covers a very large cooking area. Flared skillet is even better. Make sure liquid evaporates as quickly as possible. You want browned meat. In either method, make sure your pan is screaming hot. You can always add soy sauce, but you can't take it away. So marinade your meat using 1/2 soy sauce and 1/2 stock or water. Don't marinade the sesame seeds. As you're heating up your pan, put the sesame seeds in and swirl a couple of times in the dry pan. Reserve and add on top of the cooked mixture. That way, the sesame seeds get toasted, then relax to let the oils re-distribute. Who wants a wet sesame seed? I don't know if it's Chinese, but I added scallions (green onions) at the end. Fabulous. IN the end I separated the meat from the sauce, and cooked soba noodles in the sauce with some water added. This is a great starter recipe. Expand your horizons with it. I made spring rolls with some, and red lettuce leaves with others. Either way it was delicious.  -  03 Jan 2008  (Review from Allrecipes US | Canada)

    by
    39

    We made this last night and loved it. Used london broil and sliced it partially frozen on the meat slicer so as to get those paper thin slices. Didn't have leeks but don't know as they would've added anything. As suggested, we rolled each one up in a red lettuce leaf, along with about a tablespoon or so of rice that had been cooked with chicken broth and asian seasonings. Using the lettuce made it very refreshing. Although the beef was tender having been sliced so thin, it may benefit from adding a tablespoon of water and 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda to the marinade. This will give you beef that'll melt in your mouth! As for the heat, I thought it'd be too much, but after cooking it really mellowed and even my low-heat tolerant husband agreed that it could be bumped up a bit. All in all, great. Easy, quick cooking, very tasty.  -  11 Sep 2003  (Review from Allrecipes US | Canada)

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